Posts Tagged ‘My Inwood’

The Old Nagle Cemetery | My Inwood

The Old Nagle Cemetery | My Inwood

By Cole Thompson In mid-17th century Jan Nagle and Jan Dyckman traveled to the New World and settled in northern Manhattan. For more than two centuries the families farmed the land, raised cattle, planted orchards, built bridges and homes and even intermarried. And while Dyckman is a familiar Inwood name, largely thanks to the preservation […]


Tulip Tree of Old Inwood | My Inwood

Tulip Tree of Old Inwood | My Inwood

By Cole Thompson Before Inwood Hill Park, before there even was an Inwood, a mighty Tulip grew in the forest. In a new city lacking a sense of anything from antiquity, New Yorkers latched onto a tree. The giant tulip of Inwood became a popular destination for picnickers, school children and hikers looking to escape […]


Inwood’s Forgotten Slave Cemetery | My Inwood

Inwood’s Forgotten Slave Cemetery | My Inwood

By Cole Thompson In March of 1903 workmen in the Inwood section of northern Manhattan made a startling discovery. On a hilltop, near the present intersection of 212th Street and Tenth Avenue, were discovered row after row of skeletons buried beneath crude stone markers. According to local lore the hill contained an old slave cemetery […]


Manhattan’s Last Forest and the Nature of Cities Everywhere | Huffington Post

Manhattan's Last Forest and the Nature of Cities Everywhere | Huffington Post

By Dr. Chris Martine In the 1950s my grandparents moved my father and uncle out of the Bronx, New York, and into the New Jersey countryside on the other bank of the Hudson River. Growing up hearing stories from my dad about how felicitous it was to be plunked down into the open spaces and […]


Two Reasons to Visit Inwood: Dyckman Farmhouse Museum and Darling Coffee | NY Times

Two Reasons to Visit Inwood: Dyckman Farmhouse Museum and Darling Coffee | NY Times

By JULIE BESONEN The confluence of the Harlem and Hudson Rivers shapes a pocket of land at the northernmost tip of Manhattan, a portal to the island’s oldest forest once roamed by Native Americans. In the 1600s, warring Lenapes and Mohawks and a smallpox epidemic cleared the way for a Dutch settler, Jan Dyckman. He […]


1916: Illustrated Inwood | My Inwood

1916: Illustrated Inwood | My Inwood

By Cole Thompson In 1916 popular newspaper illustrator Herb Roth visited the Inwood region.  While there he sketched the Dyckman farmhouse and other familiar landmarks. Below are the sketches from Roth’s visit as well as the accompanying text. The Pittsburgh Press The Sunday Illustrated Magazine July 2, 1916 Manhattan As It WAS—and Still IS “How […]


The Indian Caves of Inwood Hill Park | My Inwood

The Indian Caves of Inwood Hill Park | My Inwood

By Cole Thompson On the northern tip of Manhattan, a twenty-minute walk from the subway, is an historical site so rare and unexpected that it warrants a detour on any tourist’s itinerary. The majestic “Indian caves” of Inwood Hill Park were once used as a seasonal camp by the Lenape people who lived in the […]


Fort George Amusement Park | My Inwood

Fort George Amusement Park | My Inwood

By Cole Thompson In 1895, on the same spot where George Washington and his band of Revolutionaries defended a British assault after the Battle of Brooklyn, a glorious and magnificent amusement park rivaling Coney Island opened near the northeastern end of Manhattan. The Fort George Amusement park was located in what is now Highbridge Park […]


Inwood NYC in 1881 | My Inwood

Inwood NYC in 1881 | My Inwood

By Cole Thompson “With the usual brilliant consistency of nomenclature of places, the plot is called Inwood, probably because it is neither in nor near any wood of any sort and never could have been, and when the name of Inmarsh would have been infinitely more appropriate if not picturesque.” In 1881, Inwood, of all […]


An Inwood Memorial Day Tribute | My Inwood

An Inwood Memorial Day Tribute | My Inwood

By Cole Thompson This Memorial Day weekend as we bbq and prepare for summer it is important to take a moment to honor the men and women of the United States military who, for centuries, have defended our nation and way of life. As the son and grandson of veterans of foreign wars, I understand […]


El Gallito: 1935 Sixto Escobar Fight in the Dyckman Oval | My Inwood

El Gallito: 1935 Sixto Escobar Fight in the Dyckman Oval | My Inwood

By Cole Thompson On a summer evening in 1935 some fifteen thousand boxing fans gathered under the floodlights of the Dyckman Oval to witness Puerto Rican Sixto Escobar and Coney Island kid Lou Salica battle for the world bantamweight championship title.  The two fighters, at the peak of their careers, each weighed 117-½ pounds—one half […]


Prohibition Inwood: Gangland Slaying at Dyckman Street Speakeasy | My Inwood

Prohibition Inwood: Gangland Slaying at Dyckman Street Speakeasy | My Inwood

By Cole Thompson “Roy Herbert Sloane, the shrewd and engaging young man who talked his way out of Sing Sing last fall, was cut down by shotgun fire from an automobile as he left the Mad Dot Boat Club, a speakeasy at 251 Dyckman Street, at 1 o’clock this morning.  He died half an hour […]


Princess Naomi – Uptown’s Indian Princess | My Inwood

Princess Naomi - Uptown's Indian Princess | My Inwood

By Cole Thompson Author’s note: Published reports and records vary about the spelling of Kennedy’s first name. According to descendants her name was spelled Naomie. Since moving to Inwood I’d heard stories of an almost mythical figure known only as Princess Naomie, who, in the 1930’s, took up residence near the old tulip tree in […]


Inwood 1931: The Dyckman Street Madonna | My Inwood

Inwood 1931: The Dyckman Street Madonna | My Inwood

By Cole Thompson In 1931 Inwood was two years into the throes of the greatest economic downturn this nation has ever seen. Heads of household were out of work. A barter system was established. And, while some sought solace in the speakeasies hidden neatly beneath the commercial strips along Broadway, Dyckman and 207th Streets, others […]


Paranormal Inwood: The Strange Case of Walter Francis Burns | My Inwood

Paranormal Inwood: The Strange Case of Walter Francis Burns | My Inwood

By Cole Thompson As a cool autumn breeze settled in on his home among the trees on the western slope of Inwood Hill, Walter Francis Burns awoke from a terrible dream. Lost in a chilling nightmare Burns had just witnessed his youngest son, Otway, run over by an automobile not far from the family’s northern […]


Postcards from the Edge II | My Inwood

Postcards from the Edge II | My Inwood

By Cole Thompson New York City has always been a popular subject when it comes to the world of postcards. I like to call the collection that follows “Postcards from the Edge.” For the most part, I’ve tried to focus on Inwood proper, but other subjects, like the George Washington Bridge, Edgar Allan Poe’s cottage […]


Asylums on Inwood Hill: The Darkside of the Park’s Past | My Inwood

Asylums on Inwood Hill: The Darkside of the Park’s Past | My Inwood

By Cole Thompson A century ago asylums and institutions lined the ridge of Inwood Hill. Inside these fortress-like structures, all demolished by Robert Moses in the 1930′s, tortured, long-dead souls were kept under lock and key. Some were criminals, some were inebriates and drug addicts, others had the mere misfortune of suffering from tuberculosis. All […]


Exile in Inwood: The Max Brauer Story | My Inwood

Exile in Inwood: The Max Brauer Story | My Inwood

By Cole Thompson In 1933 Nazi storm troopers entered the home of Max Brauer, the Socialist mayor of Altona, a working class German suburb just west of Hamburg. Brauer and other leaders who publicly denounced Hitler had been slated for roundup. But the handsome forty-six-year-old politician with a cleft chin and shock of dark slicked […]


Inwood Hill Park: Historical Timeline | My Inwood

Inwood Hill Park: Historical Timeline | My Inwood

By Cole Thompson Inwood Hill is a 196-acre park located on the northern tip of Manhattan. The words “wild” and “untamed” are often used to describe the meandering trails, caves, cliffs and otherworldly geological formations that together make Inwood Hill so unique. The history of Inwood Hill, like that of the surrounding city, is fascinating […]


1935 Police Beat: Babe Ruth Hits Pedestrian on Seaman Avenue | My Inwood

1935 Police Beat: Babe Ruth Hits Pedestrian on Seaman Avenue | My Inwood

By Cole Thompson On a summer evening in 1935 Julia Straus, a fifty-eight year old resident of 72 Seaman Avenue had a run in with the most famous athlete in baseball—Babe Ruth. As it happened Ruth was driving southbound on Seaman Avenue when Straus walked into the path of his car near the intersection of […]


The Fort George Tunnel Collapse: A 1903 NYC Subway Construction Disaster | My Inwood

The Fort George Tunnel Collapse: A 1903 NYC Subway Construction Disaster | My Inwood

By Cole Thompson October 24, 1903 Timothy Sullivan glanced at his watch. It was minutes before ten o’clock. The sliver of a new moon dangled above the camp. “Back to work boys,” the Irishman shouted as he gestured toward the ragged hole at the base of Fort George Hill. Sullivan, a construction foreman for New […]


From Dyckman Street to Treasure Island | My Inwood

From Dyckman Street to Treasure Island | My Inwood

By Cole Thompson Near the beginning of the last century, Mrs. Addison J. Rothermel faced both an agonizing loss and a difficult decision. Tuberculosis had taken her husband and doctors warned that her two teenage boys, Addison Jr. and Royale Valray, might also succumb to the “white plague” if they continued to live in the […]


Evidence of Native American activity uncovered in Isham Park | My Inwood

Evidence of Native American activity uncovered in Isham Park | My Inwood

by Cole Thompson An ongoing improvement project in a city park has uncovered signs of Native American settlement on the northern tip of Manhattan. Workers digging a trench for the installation of water fountains in Isham Park have unearthed a curious concentration of shells. Could the shells be part of a larger shell midden? Could […]


#TBT: Inwood Serial Killer: “Texas Jim” Baker | My Inwood

#TBT: Inwood Serial Killer: “Texas Jim” Baker | My Inwood

by Cole Thompson I had a periodical desire to poison human beings and in killing them in this manner, I derive a certain mental satisfaction.  When this mania seizes me, I want to kill the nearest person to me.” –excerpt from “Texas Jim” Baker’s murder confession. On the morning of December 27, 1928 New York […]

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