Posts Tagged ‘Fort George’

Fort George, Manhattan: Nosebleed Heights and Down-to-Earth Prices | NY Times

Fort George, Manhattan: Nosebleed Heights and Down-to-Earth Prices | NY Times

By C.J. HUGHES Despite occupying some of the highest terrain around, Fort George, near the northern point of Manhattan, can seem to be hiding in plain sight. “The tip of the island was just a complete mystery to me,” said Amy Drury, 38, who lived in a string of apartments in southerly neighborhoods, like the […]


Manhattan’s Last Forest and the Nature of Cities Everywhere | Huffington Post

Manhattan's Last Forest and the Nature of Cities Everywhere | Huffington Post

By Dr. Chris Martine In the 1950s my grandparents moved my father and uncle out of the Bronx, New York, and into the New Jersey countryside on the other bank of the Hudson River. Growing up hearing stories from my dad about how felicitous it was to be plunked down into the open spaces and […]


Inwood Hill Park: Historical Timeline | My Inwood

Inwood Hill Park: Historical Timeline | My Inwood

By Cole Thompson Inwood Hill is a 196-acre park located on the northern tip of Manhattan. The words “wild” and “untamed” are often used to describe the meandering trails, caves, cliffs and otherworldly geological formations that together make Inwood Hill so unique. The history of Inwood Hill, like that of the surrounding city, is fascinating […]


1935 Police Beat: Babe Ruth Hits Pedestrian on Seaman Avenue | My Inwood

1935 Police Beat: Babe Ruth Hits Pedestrian on Seaman Avenue | My Inwood

By Cole Thompson On a summer evening in 1935 Julia Straus, a fifty-eight year old resident of 72 Seaman Avenue had a run in with the most famous athlete in baseball—Babe Ruth. As it happened Ruth was driving southbound on Seaman Avenue when Straus walked into the path of his car near the intersection of […]


The Fort George Tunnel Collapse: A 1903 NYC Subway Construction Disaster | My Inwood

The Fort George Tunnel Collapse: A 1903 NYC Subway Construction Disaster | My Inwood

By Cole Thompson October 24, 1903 Timothy Sullivan glanced at his watch. It was minutes before ten o’clock. The sliver of a new moon dangled above the camp. “Back to work boys,” the Irishman shouted as he gestured toward the ragged hole at the base of Fort George Hill. Sullivan, a construction foreman for New […]

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