1916: Illustrated Inwood | My Inwood

By Cole Thompson

Dyckman-House-The-Pittsburgh-Press-July-2-1916-sketch-by-Herb-Roth-71

Dyckman House, The Pittsburgh Press, July 2, 1916, sketch by Herb Roth.

In 1916 popular newspaper illustrator Herb Roth visited the Inwood region.  While there he sketched the Dyckman farmhouse and other familiar landmarks.

Below are the sketches from Roth’s visit as well as the accompanying text.

The Pittsburgh Press
The Sunday Illustrated Magazine
July 2, 1916

Manhattan As It WAS—and Still IS

How many, even native New Yorkers, know that part of their tremendous city is as quaint and as “bewitched” a region as it was in the days of Wilhelm Kieft?  That even on the Island of Manhattan ghosts still walk abroad, people still dig for hidden treasure, old legends are yet extant, and spots and houses related to Revolutionary times may still be pointed out to a sightseer in exactly the same state as they were a century ago.  While by far the greater part of Manhattan Island has gone ahead, has been settled, and has become a roaring city, there is one section of it, at its extreme northwestern end, that has stood quite still and is as quaint and old-fashioned today as it was one hundred years ago.

Read more: 1916: Illustrated Inwood | My Inwood

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Dominican Film Festival to Feature More Than 50 Movies Uptown This Week | DNAinfo

By Lindsay Armstrong

Dominican-Film-Festival-in-New-York-600x400

WASHINGTON HEIGHTS — The largest celebration of Dominican cinema outside the nation itself is happening Uptown this week with the Dominican Film Festival in New York.

Now in its fourth year, the festival will showcase more than 50 films by both leaders in the Dominican film industry and emerging talents. The festival runs June 24-28.

This year’s theme, “The Way We Are!” was chosen to highlight the diversity within Dominican culture, the festival’s organizers said.

“With this year’s slogan, ‘That’s The Way We Are,’ we are extremely excited to showcase films from an array of genres and unique voices that prove to be as diverse as Dominican culture,” Armando Guareño, the festival’s founder and executive director, said in a statement.

The festival kicks off on June 24 with a red carpet event and showing of “Dólares de Arena.”

Read more: Dominican Film Festival to Feature More Than 50 Movies Uptown This Week | DNAinfo

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Op-Led: Prevent humanitarian tragedy in Dominican Republic | CNN

BY Led Black (@Led_Black)

No Ala Reforma Protest - Erika Morilla - Flag

(Photo: Erika Morilla)

My mother left the Dominican Republic in the late 1960s and came to New York City to create a better life for her children. I was born and raised in Washington Heights, but I lived in the Dominican Republic for several years as a child and have traveled back every few years since. I absolutely love the Dominican Republic.

That same love of Quisqueya, the indigenous word for the island of Hispaniola, which my parents instilled in me, I have, in turn, inculcated in my three daughters with regular trips to the Dominican Republic. It is because of that profound and abiding affection that I am so outraged and deeply saddened by the actions of those in power in the country.

Read more: Op-Led: Prevent humanitarian tragedy in Dominican Republic | CNN

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The Indian Caves of Inwood Hill Park | My Inwood

By Cole Thompson

Model-of-the-Inwood-Hill-caves-by-William-Orchard-once-on-display-at-the-Museum-of-the-American-Indian-2-768x1024

Model of the Inwood Hill caves by William Orchard, once on display at the Museum of the American Indian.

On the northern tip of Manhattan, a twenty-minute walk from the subway, is an historical site so rare and unexpected that it warrants a detour on any tourist’s itinerary.

The majestic “Indian caves” of Inwood Hill Park were once used as a seasonal camp by the Lenape people who lived in the region before the arrival of explorer Henry Hudson in 1609.

The caves, created by the tumbling of rocks during a glacial retreat more than 30,000 years ago, are a picturesque reminder of the Native people who once lived on Manhattan Isle.

The modern history of the caves began in 1890 when Alexander Crawford Chenoweth came across a curious rock formation not far from his uptown home.

Chenoweth was a respected engineer who designed the Croton Aqueduct and the base for the Statue of Liberty, but on weekends he assumed the role of amateur archeologist.

Over the course of several days, ten years before the turn of the Twentieth Century, Chenoweth carefully explored the curious rock formations he had come across just off a trail in an area of Inwood Hill known as “the Clove.”

Read more: The Indian Caves of Inwood Hill Park | My Inwood

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UPinion: Keep The High Bridge Open 24/7

BY Steven Kopstein

High Bridge Re-Opening

I was anxiously anticipating the re-opening of the High Bridge. As a resident of Upper Manhattan with strong Bronx ties I was very excited to be able to finally have a way to cross into the borough on my bike without having to either ride on a crowded narrow sidewalk or on a dangerously busy bridge. I was also thrilled at the prospect of having a tourist draw and truly unique feature to show off to and enjoy with friends and relatives. I love the prospect of new recreational facilities being developed in an area that has been blatantly underserved for many many years.

So, it was with great disappointment that I tried to cross the bridge twice this week, after the long heralded “opening” was held, and was met on both occasions with a chain link fence and no way to actually cross the bridge. The first time I attempted this crossing was last Tuesday, the opening day. I went in the evening and there were no signs explaining why the bridge was closed. Memories of Governor Christie popped into my head. But wait, he has no jurisdiction here. The second time I tried to cross, last night at around 9PM – I was met by the same locked chain link fence. This time, however, I found something even more disturbing. What appears to be permanent signs showing that the bridge has “hours” from 7AM-8PM.

Whoever is responsible for this surely must live in a bunker in Albany or Washington or some cloistered cubicle in City Hall. This bridge is so many things to so many people who LIVE and PLAY uptown and in Bronx. It’s an important link – it’s not a play-thing. It’s actually more important as a link between communities than say, The High Line is in downtown.

This bridge is an economic link. This bridge is a transportation link. This bridge is a community link.

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Uptown Video: Eckz X Dubwork – Dont Fail Me Now Anime

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