Get Yours: Limited Edition Washington Heights Warriors Tee

Warriors come out to play! In celebration of the Warriors victory, we have released a special limited edition of the Washington Heights Warriors tee. Get yours before it is too late. Spread Love It’s The Uptown Way!

Get Yours: Limited Edition Washington Heights Warriors Tee

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#InstagramUptown: Frio Frio

A post shared by Cole Thompson (@inwood_cole) on

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Spread Love: Inwards By Frankie Reese

That’s right folks; Uptown’s own Frankie Reese just released a book of poetry. Titled Inwards, the collection of poems captures the intelligence, wit and depth of Ms. Reese. Love, life, and spirituality are all explored in this truly enjoyable read. So there you have it, support this powerful young woman and buy her book.

Support: Spread Love: Inwards By Frankie Reese

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Kickstarter Spotlight: 2017 Higher Ground Festival

About this project

Higher Ground Festival 2017

We are thrilled to be offering our 3rd Annual Higher Ground Festival’s Higher Ground Premieres Performance to be held on Saturday June 24th, 2017 at Anne Loftus Playground! The performance will be free to the public and will showcase 7 new collaborations using 45 artists. This year’s program will feature various dance forms including Modern, African, Contemporary and Ballet; in music, a master of the Japanese shakuhachi flute, a harpist, singer/song writer, new musical compositions, and Armenian vocals; as well as, fashion, spoken word, visual art and theatre. We again join the Northern Manhattan Arts Alliance as part of their 15th Annual Uptown Arts Stroll.

What Is The Higher Ground Festival?

Located in the Northern Manhattan neighborhoods of Washington Heights & Inwood, the Higher Ground Festival brings the artists of these neighborhoods together to network and to create interdisciplinary stage-based collaborations performed free to the community at large. HGF allows for local artists to create and present close to home thereby offering high culture presented to the neighborhood by neighbors. Thus nurturing the connections between the artists and their community, as well as growing a strong, united and thriving uptown arts identity. We are community building through art.

Since our inaugural year in 2015, Higher Ground Festival has brought over 100 artists together through our Meet & Greet Series and Performances, and has produced 13 Premiere Collaborations presented free to the Uptown Community.

Each HG collaboration receives a $500 project stipend, donated workspace and non profit resources. HG Festival presents the projects in a full professional-grade production, retaining responsibility of organization and cost, so the artists’ only concern is to create and share!

Higher Ground Festival practices community building through art as it is our common ground.

Support Here: Kickstarter Spotlight: 2017 Higher Ground Festival

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The Fix: Kapi-Ku – Add Vice

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‘Rhythm & Power’: A Little Bling, a Little Politics, a Lot of Salsa | NY Times

By JON PARELES

Music and dance are inseparable — as they should be — at “Rhythm & Power: Salsa in New York,” the exhibition that opened this week at the Museum of the City of New York. It is the museum’s first fully bilingual exhibition.

“Rhythm & Power” celebrates the Latin music that was forged in New York City from diverse Caribbean, Pan-American, African and European styles, and savvily marketed under the catchall term salsa. Musicians initially disliked the word; they preferred more specific designations like rumba or bolero. But using “salsa” could “put everything under one roof,” said the Dominican musician Johnny Pacheco, who was the chief executive and creative director of Fania Records, which popularized the term. Calling the music salsa blurred specific national origins, drawing a broader audience in the New York City melting pot.

Salsa in its heyday — from the 1960s into the 1980s — was simultaneously an outlet for immigrant traditions, an experiment, an evolving art form, a cultural bulwark, a commercial product and, at its most idealistic, a voice for social change. It was also purposefully irresistible dance music: movement for a movement. “Rhythm & Power” touches on all of those roles.

Read more: ‘Rhythm & Power’: A Little Bling, a Little Politics, a Lot of Salsa | NY Times

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