Rising in the Heights | Manhattan Times

Photos by Emmanuel Abreu | Abreu Visuals

“¡Trump escucha; estamos en la lucha!”

Calling on President Donald Trump to “listen up,” thousands of immigrants and supporters took to the streets of Northern Manhattan on Sun., April 23, to voice opposition to the administration’s immigration policies.

People of diverse ages and nationalities filled St. Nicholas Avenue for more than two hours, carrying signs and banners and filling the air with chants, demanding a halt to deportation, raids by immigration officers, travel bans and other infringements on immigrant rights.

Organized by the Northern Manhattan Coalition for Immigrant Rights (NMCIR), the march began at 145th Street and proceeded up St. Nicholas Avenue, ending at 190th Street.

Read more: Rising in the Heights | Manhattan Times

Related: #InstagramUptown: #Uptown4ImmigrantRights

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The Sounds of ‘Mannahatta’ in Your Ear | NY Times

By JIM DWYER

Emon Hassan - Inwood Hill Park-4

(Photo: Emon Hassan)

Another visitor to New York grumbling about the racket.

“They frequently make such a noise that it is difficult for a person to make himself heard,” wrote Peter Kalm, a Swedish-Finnish naturalist. That was Manhattan in 1748.

He was writing about the chorus of frogs croaking at nightfall.

So vibrant was natural life in New York before European settlement, the city could have become “the crowning glory of American national parks,” Eric W. Sanderson of the Wildlife Conservation Society wrote in “Mannahatta: A Natural History of New York City.”

Even today, by squinting, Dr. Sanderson said in an interview, our modern eyes can glimpse remnants of the landscape of 1609, when Henry Hudson sailed into the harbor, at places like Jamaica Bay, Inwood Hill Park and Pelham Bay Park.

Read more: The Sounds of ‘Mannahatta’ in Your Ear | NY Times

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#InstagramUptown: #Uptown4ImmigrantRights

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05/06/17: Heights Teach In – Uptown Unites For Justice

For more info: 05/06/17: Heights Teach In

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Figures in the Find | Manhattan Times

Story by Sherry Mazzocchi

They’re not exactly heroes.

Instead, the actions of the main characters in Up Theater Company’s latest play go from questionable to reprehensible.

But playwright Kirby Fields doesn’t want you to like them.

“I hope, at the end, the audience would understand why they did what they did, even if they don’t necessarily agree with it,” he said.

Lost/Not Found takes place in Washington Heights. Three people down on their luck find a missing young woman and hold her as the reward for her return rises.

The play is inspired by a story that dominated the news until its tragic conclusion. An autistic child, Avonte Oquendo, walked out of his Long Island City high school one October afternoon and was nowhere to be found. His parents pleaded for his safe return.

Read more: Figures in the Find | Manhattan Times

Related:

Epic Poetry – The Review

Broad Channel – The Review

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Naming rights: Who decides what a neighborhood is called and where it starts and ends? | Crain’s New York Business

An ongoing brouhaha over what to call a section of Harlem is the latest battle in a long-running war over neighborhood naming rights

By Joe Anuta

UC - Brian-Benjamin - Crains - Harlem - SoHa

Holding the line: Brian Benjamin sees the nickname SoHa as an attack on Harlem’s history. (Photo: Buck Ennis)

A Harlem businessman in 2010 trademarked the term SoHa with plans to print T-shirts and promote southern Harlem as a residential and retail destination. Now the community board is trying to compel Paul Phillips to enforce that trademark in order to ban developers and real estate brokerages from using SoHa, a moniker it says deliberately diminishes the area’s past.

“Harlem has a rich political and cultural history, but there is also another history of rundown streets and crime,” said board chair Brian Benjamin, who is leading the fight against SoHa. “These people are trying to separate the two legacies for those who spent a lot of money on condos and brownstones and think of Harlem as a bad word.”

Arguments over what New York’s neighborhoods are called, where they start and end, and who has the right to say so are as old as the city itself. But the battles lately have become much more sophisticated. Mapping software, government approvals and even federal courts are being employed by various factions looking to demarcate the city to suit their interests. Neighborhood names and boundaries are not officially recorded by the city and largely exist as a matter of collective opinion that evolves over the years. Real estate developers, however, have had an outsize hand in christening New York’s neighborhoods since much of the city was once vacant land that they could simply buy and name themselves.

Read more: Naming rights: Who decides what a neighborhood is called and where it starts and ends? | Crain’s

Related:

Residents: Don’t call southern Harlem ‘SoHa’ | Fox 5

New medical school to open in Harlem | Crain’s New York Business

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