From Alligator Shoes to Whole Foods: Watching One Harlem Corner Over 28 Years | New York Magazine

By Christopher Bonanos

The corner of 125th Street and Malcolm X Boulevard in 1989. (Photo: Camilo José Vergara)

The corner of 125th Street and Malcolm X Boulevard in 1989. (Photo: Camilo José Vergara)

The first time Camilo José Vergara pointed his camera at the corner of 125th Street and Malcolm X Boulevard, it was 1989. Most of the upper floors of the building he photographed had been bricked up. But it was highly functional at street level. “Count how many small businesses are in this building,” says Griffin Hansbury, a.k.a. Jeremiah Moss, the blogger behind Vanishing New York and now author of a book by the same name. “This is a building that, had it been brought back to life instead of destroyed, you could theoretically have more than a dozen small businesses and people living over that.” As for its replacement, it’s mostly “a glass box with a Whole Foods and a bank.” The store opens on July 21.

Read more: From Alligator Shoes to Whole Foods: Watching One Harlem Corner Over 28 Years | New York Magazine

Related:

As Gas Stations Vanish, Harlem Sees Gentrification Creeping In | NY Times

A newcomer takes on Harlem, where a second renaissance meets gentrification nervousness | Los Angeles Times

On the Streets of Harlem, a Sense of ‘Erase and Replace’ | NY Times

We invite you to subscribe to the weekly Uptown Love newsletter, like our Facebook page and follow us on Twitter & Instagram or e-mail us at UptownCollective@gmail.com.

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...

Leave a Reply