Your Guide to Washington Heights: Living the High Life in Manhattan | Village Voice

By Alexandria Neason

 Old-school graffiti art lines the 191st Street subway pedestrian tunnel. (Photo: Amy Arbus)

Old-school graffiti art lines the 191st Street subway pedestrian tunnel. (Photo: Amy Arbus)

Once a stretch of rural countryside home to the native Munsee, modern Washington Heights, a hilly neighborhood covering much of Manhattan’s northern tip, was named for the fortification where General George Washington’s army camped to keep an eye on the advancing Redcoats. The neighborhood has over the years been home to a rotating cast of newcomers: revolutionary British colonists, Greeks, Irish, German Jews after World War II, and, in the late Sixties, a surge of Latino immigrants, especially from the Dominican Republic.

Known for its large, affordable apartments, Dominican food, and a number of preserved pre-war buildings untouched by new development, Washington Heights has played host to several New York City firsts. In the 1890s, the first moving pictures were broadcast at Morris-Jumel Mansion. Professional baseball has roots in the Heights, too: The New York Giants played at the Polo Grounds near the Harlem River at 155th Street from 1890 to 1957 and the Mets in 1962 and 1963; and before the Yankees were the Bronx Bombers, they played at Hilltop Park (now the site of Columbia University Medical Center) as the Highlanders from 1903 to 1912.

Read more: Your Guide to Washington Heights: Living the High Life in Manhattan | Village Voice

Related:

Edible Manhattan: A Self-Guided Dominican Food Tour of Washington Heights & Inwood

El Lina: The Best Little Dominican Restaurant in Washington Heights

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