For immigrant ‘Dreamers,’ an uncertain future | Christian Science Monitor

Allison Brady’s parents brought her to the United States as a child. While she’s been able to work legally under Obama’s deferred action program, she is among the 740,000 so-called ‘Dreamers’ who feel thrust back in limbo by Trump’s election promises.

By Harry Bruinius | @HarryBruinius

Nancy Villa stands in front of Harold Washington College in November. Ms. Villa was brought to the United States illegally from Mexico while a child. She has a work permit through a 2012 federal program started under Obama's administration and works at a Chicago child-care center and attends college, She and three siblings have DACA, while two siblings are US citizens. (Photo: Nam Y. Huh | AP)

Nancy Villa stands in front of Harold Washington College in November. Ms. Villa was brought to the United States illegally from Mexico while a child. She has a work permit through a 2012 federal program started under Obama’s administration and works at a Chicago child-care center and attends college, She and three siblings have DACA, while two siblings are US citizens. (Photo: Nam Y. Huh | AP)

Allison Brady was thrilled last October when she received her second temporary employment authorization card, along with another two-year reprieve from possible deportation.

Her family brought her to the United States 20 years ago when she was just 10 from the Dominican Republic. She’s lived in New York City ever since. And like some 740,000 other “Dreamers,” she qualified for President Obama’s controversial 2012 executive immigration order, Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA).

But less than a month after getting her DACA renewal, Ms. Brady, a math teacher with New York City public schools, was one of the hundreds of thousands of such Dreamers gripped with a troubling sense of uncertainty after the election of Donald Trump.

“I’m definitely worried now, not only for me, but for other people in my shoes who are in the situation I was in a few years ago,” says Brady, who is now married and is pursuing a master’s degree in education from Brooklyn College.

Indeed, with President-elect Trump and Republican majorities in both chambers of Congress vowing to undo a host of Mr. Obama’s policies, Democrats and immigration advocates have been fretting not only about the future of those undocumented immigrants who came to the country as children, but also the personal data the federal government gathered from DACA enrollees and their families.

“If any new applicants are coming in now to apply for DACA, we tell them not to,” says Angela Fernandez, executive director of the Northern Manhattan Coalition for Immigrant Rights, which has helped more than 300 young people get their temporary work permits. “We don’t want the government to have their information.”

Read more: For immigrant ‘Dreamers,’ an uncertain future | Christian Science Monitor

Related: Cause for Concern | Manhattan Times

Read more: For immigrant ‘Dreamers,’ an uncertain future | Christian Science Monitor

Related: Cause for Concern | Manhattan Times

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