A Director Pursues Diversity on Television by Telling Stories of Latinos | NY Times

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From left, Joseph La Morte, Sonia Gonzalez-Martinez and Gloria La Morte gather around a table. Standing, Angelo Lozada, left, and Tammi Cubilette. (Photo: David Gonzalez | NY Times)

From left, Joseph La Morte, Sonia Gonzalez-Martinez and Gloria La Morte gather around a table. Standing, Angelo Lozada, left, and Tammi Cubilette. (Photo: David Gonzalez | NY Times)

Television and movies changed Sonia Gonzalez-Martinez’s life. She chose her major in advertising design at the Fashion Institute of Technology after watching the 1980s sitcom “Bosom Buddies,” in which Tom Hanks and Peter Scolari goofed around at an ad agency. “It looked like fun,” she said. “But then I learned it was all about selling people things they don’t need.”

Though Ms. Gonzalez-Martinez stayed to finish her associate degree, she had an epiphany while watching the credits appear during a film: That world could be fun, too. Guided by little more than enthusiasm, she applied — and was admitted — to film school at New York University. For a Puerto Rican woman from the Bronx and Washington Heights in Manhattan, it was was another universe.

“It was a rich white kids’ school, and I felt super intimidated,” Ms. Gonzalez-Martinez said. “Thank God I had a friend there, a man of color, who told me to take it easy, it’s fine. He told me that everything I have to say and contribute is as valid as anybody else.”

That advice stayed with her as she pursued a career in film and television, starting with an early break from Spike Lee, who hired her as an apprentice film editor. Ms. Gonzalez-Martinez went on to work with the directors Milos Forman and Alan J. Pakula and as an editor on numerous documentaries. More recently, she has been writing and directing “Get Some!” It’s a web series about Sam and Viv Martell, a 40-something middle-class Latino couple trying to keep the spark in their relationship.

Rea more: A Director Pursues Diversity on Television by Telling Stories of Latinos

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