Ice-Pop Molds That Contained Walter Youngblood’s Enthusiasm | NY Times

By LIGAYA MISHAN

Mr. Youngblood's ice-pop molds. (Photo: Dina Litovsky | NY Times)

Mr. Youngblood’s ice-pop molds. (Photo: Dina Litovsky | NY Times)

“I call it the cut-and-paste apartment,” Walter Youngblood, an artist and ice-cream man, said of the fourth-floor walk-up in East Harlem where he’s lived for 20 years.

He bartered a painting for the stove and rescued the bashed-in mini-chandelier from the trash. It hangs in the kitchen, which has colonized half the living room. The refrigerator stands in a far corner, and steel wire shelves jut out, with dangling pots, pans and heavy-duty sieves at the ready.

But the tool that Mr. Youngblood, 49, treasures most is one he doesn’t use any more: a set of ice-pop molds that he bought five years ago when he started his one-man ice-cream company, KingLeche Cremes. Made of silicone, the molds are covered by an aluminum lid with slits for wooden sticks. This became troublesome: The sticks must be aligned just so, or they’ll tilt and the ice-cream bars cannot be cleanly extracted. Now he uses stainless-steel molds.

Read more: Ice-Pop Molds That Contained Walter Youngblood’s Enthusiasm | NY Times

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