Naming rights: Who decides what a neighborhood is called and where it starts and ends? | Crain’s New York Business

An ongoing brouhaha over what to call a section of Harlem is the latest battle in a long-running war over neighborhood naming rights

By Joe Anuta

UC - Brian-Benjamin - Crains - Harlem - SoHa

Holding the line: Brian Benjamin sees the nickname SoHa as an attack on Harlem’s history. (Photo: Buck Ennis)

A Harlem businessman in 2010 trademarked the term SoHa with plans to print T-shirts and promote southern Harlem as a residential and retail destination. Now the community board is trying to compel Paul Phillips to enforce that trademark in order to ban developers and real estate brokerages from using SoHa, a moniker it says deliberately diminishes the area’s past.

“Harlem has a rich political and cultural history, but there is also another history of rundown streets and crime,” said board chair Brian Benjamin, who is leading the fight against SoHa. “These people are trying to separate the two legacies for those who spent a lot of money on condos and brownstones and think of Harlem as a bad word.”

Arguments over what New York’s neighborhoods are called, where they start and end, and who has the right to say so are as old as the city itself. But the battles lately have become much more sophisticated. Mapping software, government approvals and even federal courts are being employed by various factions looking to demarcate the city to suit their interests. Neighborhood names and boundaries are not officially recorded by the city and largely exist as a matter of collective opinion that evolves over the years. Real estate developers, however, have had an outsize hand in christening New York’s neighborhoods since much of the city was once vacant land that they could simply buy and name themselves.

Read more: Naming rights: Who decides what a neighborhood is called and where it starts and ends? | Crain’s

Related:

Residents: Don’t call southern Harlem ‘SoHa’ | Fox 5

New medical school to open in Harlem | Crain’s New York Business

We invite you to subscribe to the weekly Uptown Love newsletter, like our Facebook page and follow us on Twitter & Instagram or e-mail us at UptownCollective@gmail.com.

#InstagramUptown: Build Bridges Not Walls

A post shared by DOT (@dotshotit) on

We invite you to subscribe to the weekly Uptown Love newsletter, like our Facebook page and follow us on Twitter & Instagram or e-mail us at UptownCollective@gmail.com.

In Washington Heights, 72-Year-Old Nidia Rivera Has Built an Habichuelas Con Dulce Empire | Remezcla

Written by

UC - Habichuela Con Dulce

With what seems like a permanent line at 182nd Street and St. Nicholas, it’s obvious that Nidia Rivera’s culinary prowess draws a crowd. And though her skills aren’t exactly a secret, many who frequent her shop may be too busy savoring spoonfuls of her delectable habichuelas con dulce to know how Rivera became New York City’s queen of this quintessential Dominican treat.

Like many immigrants, Nidia moved to the United States because of her children. “‘How am I going to support my children from here?’” the Dominican woman asked herself. So in the early 1990s, a 46-year-old Nidia packed up her bags, left her four children and most of her family behind so that she could arrive in Washington Heights, where her sister lived.

Within two months of arriving in New York City, the Moca-born entrepreneur began selling pastelitos, chocolate y café, and other sweets. Eventually, she realized that just like in Moca, she could sell habichuelas con dulce. According to Diario Libre, she began with a modest six pounds of beans. She ran a more modest operation then. But now, each day she makes approximately 220 pounds of the dish Monday through Friday – a number that she ups by another 110 pounds for the weekends.

Read more: In Washington Heights, 72-Year-Old Nidia Rivera Has Built an Habichuelas Con Dulce Empire | Remezcla

(more…)

4th Annual Health & Beauty Expo In Pictures

Photography by Marcus Johnson

(more…)

Kickstarter Spotlight: Hip-Hop Summer School

UC - Hip-Hop Summer School - Uptown Vinyl Supreme

About this project

Hip-Hop Summer School Breakdown

A 5-6 week youth-based curriculum focusing on the 4 elements of Hip Hop (MC, DJ, Breakdance, Graffiti). Each element will be taught by expert artists in the field. Classes will focus on the history and modern-day application of the craft via hands-on learning, workshops, field trips, and special guests. At the end of the program each class will be responsible for contributing to a “4 Elements Jam” where students will apply what they’ve learned to create an authentic and unifying performance party. Graffiti students will create the backdrop/set, MC students will host, DJ students will provide music, and breakdance students will dance and perform. Each week the classes will have a specific focus.

Support: Kickstarter Spotlight: Hip-Hop Summer School

We invite you to subscribe to the weekly Uptown Love newsletter, like our Facebook page and follow us on Twitter & Instagram or e-mail us at UptownCollective@gmail.com.

Uptown Talk: Latinos Out Loud – The Mandela Effect

UC - Latinos Out Loud

In episode 15, the crew discuss the Lala/Melo break up, Rachel’s epic showdown at the dog run and baby Instagram etiquette. Guest Milly Tamarez talks about the diversity in the improv/sketch world & what she is doing to improve it.

(more…)

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...


Framed »

#InstagramUptown: Build Bridges Not Walls
#InstagramUptown: Build Bridges Not Walls

A post shared by DOT (@dotshotit) on Apr 18, 2017 at 9:19am PDT We invite you to subscribe to the we

More in Framed

Eat Up. Drink Up. »

In Washington Heights, 72-Year-Old Nidia Rivera Has Built an Habichuelas Con Dulce Empire | Remezcla
In Washington Heights, 72-Year-Old Nidia Rivera Has Built an Habichuelas Con Dulce Empire | Remezcla

Written by Yara Simón With what seems like a permanent line at 182nd Street and St. Nicholas, it’

More in Eat Up. Drink Up.

Estilo »

4th Annual Health & Beauty Expo In Pictures
4th Annual Health & Beauty Expo In Pictures

Photography by Marcus Johnson

More in Estilo

Daily Grind »

Your Guide to Washington Heights: Living the High Life in Manhattan | Village Voice
Your Guide to Washington Heights: Living the High Life in Manhattan | Village Voice

By Alexandria Neason Once a stretch of rural countryside home to the native Munsee, modern Washingto

More in Daily Grind

Uptown Zen »

Langston Hughes' Legacy Lives on in Harlem | Bio
Langston Hughes’ Legacy Lives on in Harlem | Bio

Today, on Langston Hughes’ birthday, Renée Watson, author and executive director of I, Too, Arts

More in Uptown Zen