Your Guide to Washington Heights: Living the High Life in Manhattan | Village Voice

By Alexandria Neason

 Old-school graffiti art lines the 191st Street subway pedestrian tunnel. (Photo: Amy Arbus)

Old-school graffiti art lines the 191st Street subway pedestrian tunnel. (Photo: Amy Arbus)

Once a stretch of rural countryside home to the native Munsee, modern Washington Heights, a hilly neighborhood covering much of Manhattan’s northern tip, was named for the fortification where General George Washington’s army camped to keep an eye on the advancing Redcoats. The neighborhood has over the years been home to a rotating cast of newcomers: revolutionary British colonists, Greeks, Irish, German Jews after World War II, and, in the late Sixties, a surge of Latino immigrants, especially from the Dominican Republic.

Known for its large, affordable apartments, Dominican food, and a number of preserved pre-war buildings untouched by new development, Washington Heights has played host to several New York City firsts. In the 1890s, the first moving pictures were broadcast at Morris-Jumel Mansion. Professional baseball has roots in the Heights, too: The New York Giants played at the Polo Grounds near the Harlem River at 155th Street from 1890 to 1957 and the Mets in 1962 and 1963; and before the Yankees were the Bronx Bombers, they played at Hilltop Park (now the site of Columbia University Medical Center) as the Highlanders from 1903 to 1912.

Read more: Your Guide to Washington Heights: Living the High Life in Manhattan | Village Voice

Related:

Edible Manhattan: A Self-Guided Dominican Food Tour of Washington Heights & Inwood

El Lina: The Best Little Dominican Restaurant in Washington Heights

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Are You The Next Mr. Or Miss Harlem Shake?

UC - Mr or Miss Harlem Shake 2017

Oh snap, it’s that time of the year again. The good folks at Harlem Shake are accepting applications to be the new face of Harlem Shake. To sweeten the deal the winner will be given fame, fortune and feast. That’s right, the winner will ride in the Harlem Shake African American Day Float and their picture will grace Harlem Shake’s Wall of Fame. In addition, the lucky winner will receive 1,000 for themselves and $500 for their favorite charity! Did I mention a whole year of free burgers? Harlem residents click below and get it crackin’. You have until May 1.

Apply: Are You The Next Mr. Or Miss Harlem Shake?

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The Fix: I Am Cruz – March Malice

I Am Cruz - March Malice

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And The Winner Is…

2017 Uptown Arts Stroll Poster

She forged past the forty.

Visual artist and painter Alexis Agliano Sanborn of Washington Heights has emerged as the judges’ choice to claim the title of winner of the 2017 Uptown Arts Stroll poster contest.

Sanborn’s submission, one of forty bids, was found to best showcase the elements of Northern Manhattan’s diverse art scene. She will receive a $1,000 honorarium and exclusive graphic representation on all Uptown Arts Stroll publications.

Sanborn is a founder’s committee member of the Washington Heights and Inwood Food Council and a board member of the Washington Heights Chamber Orchestra. She received a Master’s degree from Harvard University and works as a Program Coordinator at the U. S. – Asia Law Institute at New York University and the Wa-Shokuiku Project: Japanese-inspired Food Education.

“The first time I visited New York, I came to the Cloisters and knew that I was somewhere magical,” said Sanborn, who grew up in suburban California.

“To win this prize is a reflection of everything I have ever felt and known about my neighborhood,” she added. “I am humbled and grateful.”

Read more: And The Winner Is…

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$5.5M ask for renovated Hamilton Heights mansion is a new Harlem record | 6sqft

BY

If this home is, as the listing calls it, “the jewel of this historic neighborhood,” the three-block historic Harlem enclave of Hamilton Terrace is a treasure trove, anchored by the Hamilton Grange home of Alexander Hamilton. Listed at $5,495,000, the limestone and terra cotta mansion at 72 Hamilton Terrace is recognizable by its mansard slate roof punctuated by dormer windows and the original wrought iron fencing that surrounds it. This nearly-5,000-square-foot home offers five stories of newly-renovated modern living, including a finished cellar with restaurant-style bar and a wine cellar. The home’s $5.495 price tag makes it the priciest single-family listing in the neighborhood; if it sells for that much it may be Harlem’s most expensive sale ever.

Read more: $5.5M ask for renovated Hamilton Heights mansion is a new Harlem record | 6sqft

Related: Quaint townhouse on Manhattan’s secluded Sylvan Terrace seeks $1.625M | Curbed NY

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Want To Escape? Harlem Holds A Unique, Black-Owned Option | Blavity

By Namon Eugene

Hoodwinked Escape

“What in the world is an escape room?”

I asked that question several times throughout the years and never got a clear answer.

In 2015, while interning at a radio station in Manhattan, I was hearing about escape rooms on a daily basis. I never had time to go and I never bothered to look further into it. Then, when I moved to New York permanently in 2016, my sister would regularly mention how much she wanted to try one out. I was too caught up in the city grind and never dug deeper. But this year, to my surprise, I received a message inviting me to finally experience the elusive attraction. Recently, during one unusually warm winter night, I hopped on the 3 train and trucked it to uptown Manhattan to discover what all the fuss is about.

The best way to grasp what an escape room is about is to go to one, but if I were to try and describe the experience, I would compare it to the popular Saw movie franchise—the thrill and excitement of trying to free yourself from a strange, and sometimes quirky, puzzle filled room — minus the terrible macabre deaths (thank God). They make you think way beyond the ordinary, and Hoodwinked Escape, a black-owned escape room in the heart of Harlem, delivers excitement beyond your most logical expectations.

Read more: Want To Escape? Harlem Holds A Unique, Black-Owned Option | Blavity

Related:

On Your Mark, Get Set, Escape…

Harlem Business Wants to Lock You in a Room and Give You an Hour to Escape | DNAinfo

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Your Guide to Washington Heights: Living the High Life in Manhattan | Village Voice
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