Told to Go Back to Guatemala, She Sought Sanctuary Instead | NY Times

By LIZ ROBBINS and JONATHAN WOLFE

At her July check in with immigration authorities, Ms. Morales was told to buy a ticket back to Guatemala. (Photo: James Estrin | NY Times)

At her July check in with immigration authorities, Ms. Morales was told to buy a ticket back to Guatemala. (Photo: James Estrin | NY Times)

On Thursday, instead of showing up at her immigration check-in with a nonstop ticket to Guatemala, as she had been told to do, Amanda Morales Guerra, 33, walked into Holyrood Episcopal Church-Iglesia Santa Cruz in Washington Heights. She did not know when she could emerge again.

Local clergy estimate that more than a dozen people around New York City have quietly been hiding in churches to avoid deportation from federal immigration agents since the Trump administration began, but Ms. Morales was the first to publicly seek sanctuary.

“Sincerely, I don’t want to abandon my children,” she said in Spanish, sitting on the floor of the rectory library, where she and her three young children would also sleep. “I’m doing it for them because I love them and I would die if something happened to me or my children.”

Read more: Told to Go Back to Guatemala, She Sought Sanctuary Instead | NY Times

Related: Guatemalan immigrant seeks sanctuary in Manhattan church | NY Daily News

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Uptown Video: Desus & Mero Chop It Up With Rep. Adriano Espaillat

The always funny Desus & Mero recently had Congressman Adriano Espaillat on the show and boy was it funny. They asked him about Cardi B, chancletas and much more. Check it out below.

(more…)

In Harlem, a New Triennial Parses the Historical, Political, and Social Context of “Uptown” | Hyperallergic

The inaugural show at Columbia University’s Wallach Art Gallery spotlights 25 artists living or practicing north of 99th Street.

BY Seph Rodney

Miguel Luciano, “Run-a-Bout” (2017), restored and customized 1969 Schwinn Runabout bicycle, chrome-plated machete; and “Puerto Rican Flag in Red, Black, and Green” (2017), nylon fabric

The newly reopened Wallach Art Gallery’s Uptown — a survey of work by 25 artists living or practicing north of 99th Street — lives inside the brand new Lenfest Center for the Arts, an eight-story, 60,000-square-foot building that houses performance and gallery spaces as well as a 150-seat theater. The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Art Gallery has been around since 1986, but you might not know that, given that it has been sequestered inside some stodgy wood-paneled rooms on the eighth floor of Schermerhorn Hall on Columbia University’s Morningside campus. Whereas its previous incarnation felt like a gallery intended to cultivate a conversation around visual art, primarily among Columbia’s faculty, visiting fellows, and students, now the gallery is quite literally outward-facing (looking out onto 125th Street). If you visit the new gallery in the daytime, you’ll see the work enveloped in natural light streaming through the floor-to-ceiling windows.

Uptown is multifaceted — it seeks to restore some of the sheen to the term “uptown” in reference to Harlem, which almost a century ago was a mecca for literary, visual, and performing arts; announce the presence of a prominent institutional agent in the district’s art ecology; and, perhaps most crucially, serve a kind of ambassadorial function for the university.

Read more: In Harlem, a New Triennial Parses the Historical, Political, and Social Context of “Uptown” | Hyperallergic

Uptown continues at the Wallach Art Gallery in the Lenfest Center for the Arts (615 West 129th Street, Harlem) through August 20.

Related:

The Uptown Triennial Casts Harlem in Vivid Relief | Village Voice

Considering Community as Art Galleries Help Gentrify Harlem | Hyperallergic

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Inwood Latino-Owned Bar Shutters After 46 Years | DNAinfo

By Carolina Pichardo

Johnny Caro, 67, said he's shutting down Mi Nido Taverna on 148 Nagle Ave., after 46 years in business. (Photo: Carolina Pichardo | DNAinfo)

Johnny Caro, 67, said he’s shutting down Mi Nido Taverna on 148 Nagle Ave., after 46 years in business. (Photo: Carolina Pichardo | DNAinfo)

INWOOD — Mi Nido Taverna is flooded with old signs and community fliers with brown, folded edges and a faint cigarette smell that owner, Johnny Caro, 67, said remains in the air from before smoking inside bars became illegal.

But after 46 years, the 148 Nagle Ave. bar, one of the first Latino-owned bars to open in Inwood, will write the final chapter of its history when it permanently closes its doors at the end of the month.

The bar had already stopped serving drinks July 24, but Caro has kept his doors open while cleaning up the space to say goodbye to people. He said a few have stopped by to give him cards and letters.

“We were the pioneers here. We were the first Spanish bars up here,” Caro said, adding that his father also owned a bar on Nagle Avenue. “There was nothing on Dyckman before us.”

Read more: Inwood Latino-Owned Bar Shutters After 46 Years | DNAinfo

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Call For Artists: The Art of Healing

Washington Heights - All You Need is Love Mural

Photo: Briana E. Heard

The Northern Manhattan Arts Alliance (NoMAA), in collaboration with NY–Presbyterian – The Allen Hospital, is seeking submissions for NoMAA’s next exhibition entitled “The Art of Healing”. Guest-curated by Gabriel de Guzman (Curator of Visual Arts at Wave Hill), this exhibition will present work by uptown artists who are exploring the theme of healing, whether figuratively, conceptually, literally, or abstractly.

The body is remarkable for its ability to heal, as evidenced by the outstanding work at the Allen Hospital. During uncertain times, it is equally important for the psyche to remain healthy as well. Artists are invited to submit works that evoke the idea of healing and that investigate this dual capacity for corporal and emotional renewal. In the context of this place of healing, restoring patients to well-being is as much an everyday occurrence as it is an extraordinary one.

Timeline:

  • Submission deadline: 26 September 2017
  • Notification: 11 October
  • Drop off and installation: 19 October
  • Opening: 24 October

Submit your proposal ►

Open to artists working or residing in El Barrio, Inwood, Washington Heights, or Harlem. Four artists will be selected from the submissions.

Work should be appropriate for a family-friendly audience.

Artist stipend: $400

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