And The Winner Is…

2017 Uptown Arts Stroll Poster

She forged past the forty.

Visual artist and painter Alexis Agliano Sanborn of Washington Heights has emerged as the judges’ choice to claim the title of winner of the 2017 Uptown Arts Stroll poster contest.

Sanborn’s submission, one of forty bids, was found to best showcase the elements of Northern Manhattan’s diverse art scene. She will receive a $1,000 honorarium and exclusive graphic representation on all Uptown Arts Stroll publications.

Sanborn is a founder’s committee member of the Washington Heights and Inwood Food Council and a board member of the Washington Heights Chamber Orchestra. She received a Master’s degree from Harvard University and works as a Program Coordinator at the U. S. – Asia Law Institute at New York University and the Wa-Shokuiku Project: Japanese-inspired Food Education.

“The first time I visited New York, I came to the Cloisters and knew that I was somewhere magical,” said Sanborn, who grew up in suburban California.

“To win this prize is a reflection of everything I have ever felt and known about my neighborhood,” she added. “I am humbled and grateful.”

Read more: And The Winner Is…

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$5.5M ask for renovated Hamilton Heights mansion is a new Harlem record | 6sqft

BY

If this home is, as the listing calls it, “the jewel of this historic neighborhood,” the three-block historic Harlem enclave of Hamilton Terrace is a treasure trove, anchored by the Hamilton Grange home of Alexander Hamilton. Listed at $5,495,000, the limestone and terra cotta mansion at 72 Hamilton Terrace is recognizable by its mansard slate roof punctuated by dormer windows and the original wrought iron fencing that surrounds it. This nearly-5,000-square-foot home offers five stories of newly-renovated modern living, including a finished cellar with restaurant-style bar and a wine cellar. The home’s $5.495 price tag makes it the priciest single-family listing in the neighborhood; if it sells for that much it may be Harlem’s most expensive sale ever.

Read more: $5.5M ask for renovated Hamilton Heights mansion is a new Harlem record | 6sqft

Related: Quaint townhouse on Manhattan’s secluded Sylvan Terrace seeks $1.625M | Curbed NY

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Want To Escape? Harlem Holds A Unique, Black-Owned Option | Blavity

By Namon Eugene

Hoodwinked Escape

“What in the world is an escape room?”

I asked that question several times throughout the years and never got a clear answer.

In 2015, while interning at a radio station in Manhattan, I was hearing about escape rooms on a daily basis. I never had time to go and I never bothered to look further into it. Then, when I moved to New York permanently in 2016, my sister would regularly mention how much she wanted to try one out. I was too caught up in the city grind and never dug deeper. But this year, to my surprise, I received a message inviting me to finally experience the elusive attraction. Recently, during one unusually warm winter night, I hopped on the 3 train and trucked it to uptown Manhattan to discover what all the fuss is about.

The best way to grasp what an escape room is about is to go to one, but if I were to try and describe the experience, I would compare it to the popular Saw movie franchise—the thrill and excitement of trying to free yourself from a strange, and sometimes quirky, puzzle filled room — minus the terrible macabre deaths (thank God). They make you think way beyond the ordinary, and Hoodwinked Escape, a black-owned escape room in the heart of Harlem, delivers excitement beyond your most logical expectations.

Read more: Want To Escape? Harlem Holds A Unique, Black-Owned Option | Blavity

Related:

On Your Mark, Get Set, Escape…

Harlem Business Wants to Lock You in a Room and Give You an Hour to Escape | DNAinfo

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03/31/17: Film Screening and Musical Q+A of We Like It Like That: The Story of Latin Boogaloo

We Like It Like That - Boogagloo Film

El Museo del Barrio in collaboration with the Museum of the City of New York present a free screening of We Like it Like That: The Story of Latin Boogaloo as part of the Metro Mashup: New York Meets Havana series.  Stay after the film for a special musical Q+A with Latin boogaloo legend Johnny Colon and Joe Bataan, and legendary NYC Latin Percussionist Benny Bonilla, moderated by Latin Jazz great Bobby Sanabria. We Like It Like That tells the story of Latin boogaloo, a colorful (musical) expression of 1960s Latino soul, straight from the streets of New York City. From its origins to its recent resurgence, it’s the story of a sound that redefined a generation and was too funky to keep down. Through original interviews, music recordings, live performances, dancing and rare archival footage and images We Like It Like That explores this fascinating, though often overlooked, bridge in Latin music history.

RSVP: 03/31/17: Film Screening and Musical Q+A of We Like It Like That: The Story of Latin Boogaloo

Related: Put You On: We Like It Like That

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New York City Bodegas And The Generations Who Love Them | NPR

BY HANSI LO WANG

(Photo: Briana E. Heard)

In New York City, there’s a place on almost every block where you can buy a bag of chips or a lottery ticket. Elsewhere, it’s called a corner store. But in the Big Apple, it’s known as a bodega.

In Spanish, bodega can mean “storeroom” or “wine cellar.”

New Yorkers like Miriam Gomez, though, know bodegas as neighborhood institutions you can count on at just about any hour of the day or night.

“Where supermarkets are closed, the bodegas are open,” she says after making a purchase at Stop One Gourmet Deli on the Lower East Side of Manhattan.

Still, bodegas are part of a shrinking breed of business in New York, where rising rent and chain stores are putting pressure on mom-and-pop shops.

“A lot of them are closing. A lot of people are just giving up. You know, it’s not fair,” says Josefine Rodriguez, who manages Stop One Gourmet Deli.

Rodriguez came to the U.S. from the Dominican Republic when she was three months old. She says she’s been shopping at bodegas all her life for cuts of meat and fresh fruit that connect her with her roots.

“We’re Spanish people. We got to keep our culture and our things together,” she says. “You can’t just get rid of people just like that.”

Read more: New York City Bodegas And The Generations Who Love Them | NPR

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